Is it a Good Idea to Close Credit Cards I don't Use?

by Rebecca Eve Selkowe, J.D

3 myths about your credit score:

I never really talked much about credit scores before, but that is starting to change now as I’m realizing how much unnecessary worry, concern, and confusion swirls around them.

So first things first. Your credit score is one credit bureau’s opinion of how likely you are to be able to repay the money you borrow.

Annnd… we’re done here!

[drops mic.]

Heh.

Of course, there’s a lot more to it than that – what factors go into it, what it means, how to have a good one – and based on what I hear from my very smart, very educated clients, a lot of mystery, too!  Here are the top three myths about your credit score, debunked.

Myth #1: If I never use my credit card, I’ll have good credit. WRONG. Your credit score is based on large part on how good you are with credit.  If you don’t actually use credit, no one will know if you’re good at it.  So if you don’t use a credit card, you won’t have bad credit, but your score definitely won’t be as high as it could (and, if you’re financially responsible enough to respect credit cards enough to fear them, as high as it should) probably be.

Myth #2: I should close any credit cards I don’t use. I hear this all the time. I scream “NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!” and start lifting things up and smashing them.  Okay I don’t really do this… but I want to.  Unlike in, ahem, other areas of our lives, when it comes to your credit score, size matters! Your score is based on part on how much credit you have available to you AND on the length of your credit history (how long you’ve been using a particular account). Closing cards reduces the amount of credit you have.  Closing your oldest card shortens your credit history.  New accounts, bad.  Old accounts, good.  HULK SMASH!

Myth #3: My credit score is the same as my credit report.  NOPE.  Your score is BASED on your report.  You can get your credit report for free each year, but it will not include your credit score.  You definitely want to make sure you’re on top of that report to make sure everything in it is accurate.  You can get your score for free, too, but you may have to do some finagling.  Your score is useful, but the report is even more useful.

There you go. Three myths about your credit score. Pop quiz next week! :)

If you have your head buried in the sand about YOUR credit score, it’s time to get it out. Good, bad, ugly, you have to know that number.  You may be surprised, you may be devastated, but you know that saying “start where you are?”  That’s you and your credit score.

So go check it.

Did these surprise you? Did you know these already? Are you all, tell me something I don’t know? What other questions did this raise for you?