There’s No Freedom in Waiting to be Rich

by Ann Wilson

It’s one of the most basic questions ever: What do you and 99% of the population want most?

Most people will say “More money.” Specifically, we want to be rich. Who wouldn’t? If you’re rich, you really don’t have much to worry about, except maybe what to do with all that money, or maybe what to do with that “distant cousin” you never knew you had. Still, that’s a problem most people will gladly accept. It’s what I like to call a “Quality Problem”.

More money means having the support you want, doing what you want, when you want, with whom you want to do it, and all without having to ask permission from anyone. No bosses, no deadlines, no performance appraisals—being in charge of your own life.

Since this is so obvious … why are we even talking about it?

Because sometimes, the obvious is so obvious that we miss the point. When we talk about wanting to be wealthy, what are we really talking about; money, or the things we believe money will give us?

There’s a pretty big difference between the two! Does having more money absolutely mean having more freedom, or security, or fun, or peace of mind or what ever else it is you believe it will bring you? Not necessarily.

Being financially rich certainly provides material convenience, but you and I know there are plenty of rich people out there who are completely miserable. Sometimes they miss the whole point of being wealthy.

One of the greatest lessons I learnt on my journey to financial freedom is that MONEY IS NOT THE END!

“Hold the horses, Ann!” - you might be thinking? If money isn’t the point of all this then why are we even talking?

You see, Money isn’t the end but it is an incredible and very powerful resource that you absolutely must master in order to live the life you desire.

The key points here are Mastering Money and Living the Life You Desire. To do this you need to know what is is you really want.

What we’re really seeking is a feeling that we associate with being rich. The house we want can give us a sense of comfort. The car we want can heighten a feeling of importance. Travel and toys can bring excitement and stave off boredom. The passive cash flow can give us freedom to choose not to work. But you don’t have to wait to have loads of money in order to have all of these things or experience the feelings of freedom and happiness.

The goal isn’t to get rich in order to be free. Let’s turn that around! Choose freedom now and truly get that you already have it. Ironically, when I “got” this, when I fully understood this, by financial wealth expanded exponentially.

I finally understood that Wealth = Money + Rich Life Experiences

How do we get wealthy now? Financially speaking, you do this by realising that every decision you make is your choice. Every cent, Pound, Dollar, Euro or Rand you spend is your choice and what you get for it in return will create either money heaven or hell.

You ensure that some of those spend decisions result in you buying and creating passive income streams —some to build, some to buy—letting those streams gather momentum over a few years, reaping the rewards, then doing more of this with other passive income structures. This way, you get the material wealth that gives you tangible freedom from having to worry about working—one of the basic goals of our desire to be rich.

You also ensure that you get massive value from your other spend decisions, ensuring that your money brings you rich life experiences now - not some time down the road when you are “rich”. This is easy if you really know what it is you want, what emotion are you after. So spend some time checking in on what it is you really want to feel and choose to have that in your life NOW!

You do both by learning how to Master Your Money  

Freedom is only as good as the results of your true intentions. In other words, keep the endgame in mind. We’re not getting rich to live sometime in the future. We want to live a rich life now, full of passion and purpose while we master and grow our money.  There’s no freedom in waiting.

FREEDOM STARTS NOW

 

 

Natural Networking

by Raleigh Mayer

“Only Connect” –E.M. Forster

 Networking. Everybody’s doing it: Or should be.

Cultivating and maintaining a wide network of personal and professional contacts is a required skill for anyone active in the business world and community environment, and often the foundation for securing new clients, new business, or new careers. In fact, networking’s become such a ‘necessary evil’ that many people are offended by the very word. However, when done properly, networking, or simply meeting people, can be fun, and quite productive in terms of informational exchange as well as opportunity.  The key is to offer yourself: as a resource, a referral base, or simply ally and friend, rather than going in looking to gain something at the outset. This perspective will change the dynamics in terms of how you approach others, and how you present yourself.  But where and how does one begin? The answer is here and now.

 Establish Presence

Before you “go public”, even on weekends and off-hours, give some thought to your wardrobe, accessories, and overall grooming, keeping in mind that casual should not translate to sloppy.

Get in the habit of carrying business cards at all times, and always be ready with a smile, a firm and energetic handshake, and light conversation topics. Be quick to extend your hand and introduce yourself.  For more formal or organized business or professional events also:

  • Use your time to talk to people, rather than eat or drink. Eat beforehand.
  • Develop a brief and clever (20 seconds maximum) self-introduction, not a sales pitch.
  • Pronounce your name clearly, and make sure you hear the other person’s as well. If you are unsure of their name or pronunciation, ask them to repeat it right away.
  • If you are holding a drink, keep it in your left hand, so you can shake hands easily.
  • Speak with enthusiasm; say only positive, upbeat things about yourself and the event.
  • Ask open-ended questions, and do more listening than talking.

 Navigating an Event

Most of us are a little intimidated, if not plain terrified, to meet large groups of new people. But the most counter-productive approach to attending an event is to bring a friend or colleague as a ‘bodyguard’, to protect you from going it alone. By all means, attend with a friend - then separate during the event.  Instead, to minimize anxiety and maximize connections:

  • Arrive early. The few people already in attendance will focus fully on you, and your comfort level will raise before the room is crowded.
  • Leave behind (or check) big bags and briefcases. You need to be able to mingle easily.
  • Feel free to join groups of more than two people. How do you think the rest got there?
  • Always ask for business cards if you care to, but do not offer yours unless asked.
  • If you would like to exit from a conversation, simply thank the person for the chat and the chance to meet, shake hands warmly, and move on. Skip the excuses about going to the bar or bathroom.

 Following Up

New acquaintances are like seedlings: They won’t grow if left alone.  So, if you are serious about maintaining contact, make sure to:

  • Email them right away to express your pleasure with the introduction.
  • Thank them promptly if they offered or delivered something helpful.
  • If you offered resources or referral, do so immediately.
  • Let contacts know the outcomes of their referrals or recommendations.
Comment

Raleigh Mayer

Raleigh Mayer, known as the “Gravitas Guru”, is an executive development consultant, coach, and speaker, specializing in presentation, communication, and leadership, including programs designed specifically for the career acceleration of female executives. Formerly a vice president and spokesperson for the New York City Marathon, Raleigh has coached and trained executive clients for more than a decade and serves a wide variety of Fortune 500 companies.  She is currently a senior fellow at the Logos Institute for Crisis Management and Executive Leadership, a leadership lecturer at New York University and Barnard College, and on the leadership council of the Financial Women’s Association.

Your Greatest Wealth

by Jodi Krizer Graber

The greatest wealth is health. I believe that but I cannot take credit for the quote. It is attributed to Virgil, one of Rome’s greatest poets who lived from 70 BC – 19 BC. So we’re not talking “new age-y” thoughts here; it seems more like tried and true fact after all these years. Trust me, I’m not suggesting money isn’t important, let’s face it, we all need money to live (and buy healthy food), but I’m afraid that we take our health for granted in the pursuit of wealth. It should be the other way around: go for health with your all might and you will live a rich life.

Think about it – when you aren’t feeling well, even with “just” aches and pains due to the common cold, can you be at your best? Are you able to concentrate at work and generate income? Could you get up in front of a room full of investors and pitch your company? Sometimes the fatigue can make you cranky and tired and you end up forgetting to pay a credit card bill by the due date. That’s a lot of money being spent on account of poor health.

Too often people believe that “getting healthy” these days costs too much money – a gym membership, a personal trainer, organic food, etc. It doesn’t have to be that way. Some no-cost/low-cost physical activity ideas: walk/run outdoors, walk the stairs in your apartment or office building, buy a yoga/pilates DVD, purchase a set of resistance bands, get seven to eight hours of sleep each night. What’ll it be?  It’s a good thing money isn’t an issue here - it’s all up to you.

Regarding organic food, yes, if you put a conventionally-grown apple next to an organic apple, there is going to be a price difference. A carton of organic milk is going to cost more than “regular” milk. Don’t think of the cost of healthy food as organic versus conventional; think of it as a big picture. How are you spending your money? Do you eat out a lot or get take-out? Are you buying a lot of junk food? Do you spend $5 a day (or more) on coffee? These dollars and cents add up quickly and could instead be spent on more nutritious options at the grocery store.

And it still doesn’t all have to be all organic. I certainly believe that organic food is healthier and worth the investment, but if you are just getting used to the idea of spending more per item, it may seem daunting. We need to start somewhere, so choose one item to buy organic. What’s the product you (or your children) consume the most? Milk? Eggs? Broccoli? Apples? Cut down on expenses where you can (think about that $5 cup of coffee) and start buying one item organic from now on. It won’t hurt your wallet and you might even save money because a healthier you means less doctor visits.

Your health is your greatest wealth. What investment are you going to make today?

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Jodi Krizer Graber

Jodi Krizer Graber spent 20 years as a thriving arts executive in New York City, but the pressure of this success put a tremendous strain on her health, personal life and well-being.  Her journey from a type-A, overwhelmed, anxiety-ridden perfectionist and workaholic to a calm, content coach, consultant and speaker wasn’t easy, but well worth the ride. As a certified holistic health counselor and stress management and self-care expert, she is passionate about helping people be the best they can be and supporting individuals to live a healthy, happy and abundant life. 

Jodi has helped women transform their relationship to their bodies and themselves by inspiring, educating and empowering them to make healthy food and lifestyle choices. To find out how you can manage your stress and anxiety, release weight, banish fatigue and boost your energy, visit www.bravowellness.com.

Imagine…Envisioning and Creating Your New Future!

by Karen McMahon

If you could design your ideal life what would it look like?  Most people actually don’t know.  We are so programmed to think about what we don’t want, couldn’t afford, can’t have, what won’t work…that we rarely give ourselves the gift of dreaming about our true desires, all obstacles aside!

Ask a child to tell you their dreams and they can immediately start rambling about what they want, who they want to be, and all types of details about their desires.  They have not yet learned to be stifled by potential obstacles.  The do not operate from a place of fear and unbelief in themselves but rather embrace the possibilities the world has to offer.  We, as adults, put ourselves in a box each time we deny ourselves the opportunity to tap into our deepest desires and allow ourselves to manifest them in our lives.  Perhaps we need to be more child-like.

So, back to your ideal life…  How do you begin the exciting process of creating your new life? What area of your life do you desire to re-create: relationships, career, finances, lifestyle, physical or emotional health, personal development or a deeper spiritual connection?

Start with asking yourself key questions.  If I could have “X”, what would that be like for me?  If it is a relationship you desire with your children, family or a new partner, describe the ideal.  Make a list of the attributes of the relationship; interactions that you would want; details of what might grow from such a relationship.

If it is a new career or the ability to make more money; what does that look like to you?  What do you most enjoy doing and what gifts, talents and skills do you have to offer the world?  If you could create your perfect job, what would you do; what would your day look like from the time you awoke until you lay your head back down on your pillow?

Perhaps you want to live in a different place or in a different way.  Describe your ideal living situation.  Where do you envision yourself living, what does the home look like, where is it located, how many rooms, what is the floor plan, describe the grounds, what does it have that makes it fit who you are?  What else is important in your living situation?

If there were no obstacles, no time constraints, no money concerns, nothing standing in your way, what would your new life look like?

Take some time to imagine all the details.  Use all your senses.  Smell the coffee as you begin your day, the flowers in the garden you sit in or work in, the fresh breeze you smell from your porch or while riding your horse or boating on the open sea!  Feel the flow of your day, the comfort of your living room, the appreciation of your office; or the excitement or passion in your work or the feeling of being in a healthy relationship.  Touch your favorite chair, the dirt in your garden, the hand of your partner, the horse’s mane.  See the details… your healthy body, the attributes of your new relationship with your kids, friends, partner; the particulars of your new job and what talents and energy you bring to it.

If you are going through a divorce and grieving the loss of your marriage, ask yourself what you want in a committed relationship?  How would you change to be a better, healthier partner?  What would you look for ina partner?  How might your priorities have shifted after what has happened in your marriage?  What have you learned and how might you take those lessons into your next relationship?

As you do this exercise, it is natural for all the negatives to rear their ugly heads; all that you can’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, shouldn’t, won’t, and don’t do.  Notice what they are and how they make you feel and then put them aside, for now.  You must first know what your aspirations are, all possible obstacles aside, in order to figure out how to attain them.

Now begin to create a plan.  Baby steps are the key.

  1. Clarify your desires.  What awareness has come to the fore?  If you are a writer, write about it; an artist, draw it; an extravert, talk to a friend or loved one to process it.  Whatever your way is, draw out that dream in as much detail as you can.
  2. Challenge your fears. What fears and obstacles come up for you? Write them down and challenge them. How true are they?  Try to look at your situation from a different lens, shift your perspective.  How true is it that you cannot attain your goal?  What is another possible way of looking at the situation? Prioritize your fears from the greatest to the least and begin challenging them from the least up to the greatest.
  3. Take Action. What is one baby step that you can take in the direction of your dream? A baby step is exactly that…a very small step.  It can be to meditate on the dream, write about your desires, research some small piece of information that will help guide you, make a phone call, buy a book on the topic.  Take one small baby step toward your dream and see how it develops, one step at a time.

Congratulations!  You have begun a journey through which you will create a life that fulfills you.  Believe it. Embrace it.  Watch it unfold, one step at a time.

Comment

Karen McMahon

Karen McMahon, Certified Relationship & Divorce Coach & Master Energy Practitioner is the founder of KM Life Coaching and co-author of “Navigating Your Divorce: A guide to the Legal, Financial and Emotional Basics”, a free ebook. Karen’s passion is to work with men and women going through the divorce process; helping them navigate the difficulties while focusing on personal growth and embracing the opportunities that lie ahead.

The Rise Of The "Sugar Mamma"

Money expert Manisha Thakor discusses the rise of the female breadwinner and co-breadwinner in America. In particular she highlights the growing interest in financial education by working women seeking financial freedom and financial security.

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Gen X & Gen Y – Dialing Financial 911

by Manisha Thakor

Six Reasons Why Gen X & Gen Y Need Some Serious Financial TLC  

  • They’re scared: They’ve entered their adult years during a gut-wrenching economic and job market. With unemployment over 9.5%, they’ve seen their parents struggle. Over 7 out of 10 Americans are now living paycheck-to-paycheck.

  • They are making poor decisions: As a result of that fear they are not making the best long-term decisions for their futures. A recent ICI study shows only 34% of investors under age 35 are willing to take substantial risk with their retirement money – the exact time in their lives when they should take that risk.

  • Something as “simple” as a 20-year head start can give you 5x more money: Let’s take 2 people. Jane starts saving $5,000 a year at age 25 for her retirement every year until age 65 and gets an average return of 7%. Jane has a $1 million nest egg by retirement. Joe starts saving $5,000 a year at age 45 for retirement every year until age 65 and also gets an average return of 7%. Joe has $200,000 in his next egg. That 20-year head start gave Jane 5x more money. That’s why learning the basics of personal finance – how to budget, get out of debt, and save so you can get that retirement fund funded in the key early years is so vital.

  • Young adults consume information differently so there’s a delivery challenge when it comes to education: Studies shows that young adults want their financial education delivered in a 21st Century way. They want it web-based with robust, interactive tools. And unlike their “I’ll do it myself” parents, these emerging adults want help and guidance.

  • Nearly half of Gen Y has below average financial fluency: A study by The National Foundation for Credit Counseling showed that nearly half of this generation did not understand how to save and budget and that 45% of them have no savings!

  • The financial world is geometrically more complex: Part of the reason for the above statistic is due to the fact that financial literacy is not taught in schools as a core life skill. Young adults often rely on parents who were brought up in “financially simpler” times and aren’t equipped to help. They are also bombarded by so many more unrealistic media images about what “normal” lives are like.

So, what’s the solution?

If you or someone you love is a Gen X or Gen Y-er… encourage them to self-educate.  Here are some of my favorite personal finance sites – all of which I’ve either written for or read regularly myself:

What about you – any additional resources to recommend to Gen X & Gen Y?

[For more MoneyZen in your life, follow Manisha on Twitter at @ManishaThakor, on Facebook at /ManishaThakor, or visit MoneyZen.com.]

Comment

Manisha Thakor

From Manisha's linkedin profile page:

Manisha Thakor is the Director of Wealth Strategies for Women at Buckingham Strategic Wealth and The BAM Alliance. 

Manisha and her colleagues provide both evidence-based wealth advisory services for high-net-worth households and core asset management solutions for women and families nationwide with $80,000 or more in investible assets. 

An ardent financial literacy advocate for women, Manisha is the co-author of two critically acclaimed personal finance books: ON MY OWN TWO FEET: a modern girl’s guide to personal finance and GET FINANCIALLY NAKED: how to talk money with your honey. She is on Faculty at The Omega Institute and serves as a Financial Fellow at Wellesley College. Manisha is also a member of The Wall Street Journal’s Wealth Experts Panel, a member of the 2015 CNBC Financial Advisor’s Council, and wearing her financial educator’s hat serves as a part of TIAA-CREF’s Women’s Initiative. 

Manisha's financial advice has been featured in a wide range of national media outlets including CNN, PBS, NPR, The Today Show, Rachel Ray, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The LA Times, Real Simple, Women’s Day, Glamour, Essence, and MORE magazine.

Prior to joining the Buckingham team, Manisha spent over twenty years working in financial services. On the institutional side she worked as an analyst, portfolio manager and client relations executive at SG Warburg, Atalanta/Sosnoff Capital, Fayez Sarofim & Co., and Sands Capital Management. After this she moved to the retail side and ran her own independent registered investment advisory firm, MoneyZen Wealth Management. 

Manisha earned her MBA from Harvard Business School in 1997, her BA from Wellesley College in 1992 and is a CFA charterholder. She lives in Portland, OR where she delights in the amazing Third Wave coffee scene and stunning natural beauty of the Pacific NorthWest. Manisha’s website is MoneyZen.com.

Ladies, Should You Ask For It?

by Manisha Thakor

Quick - what was the first thing that came to your mind when you read the title of this post?

What about "Gentleman, should you ask for it?" Would this change your response? For many people the female-oriented title raises sexual connotations while the male-oriented iteration conjures thoughts of money and power. 

For the record, in both cases I am talking about asking for raises at work. This is a subject that has long made my stomach churn.  As a natural people-pleaser-and-avoider-of-conflict, I've preferred to work hard and hope my results will speak loudly for themselves. Turns out I'm not alone in this. 

Recently I talked with Carnegie Mellon Professor Linda Babcock, coauthor of "Women Don't Ask" and "Ask For It," two fantastic books on why and how working women should negotiate salaries.  (Professor Babcock is also very involved with motivating young girls. Thanks to her, the Girl Scouts now have a badge for negotiation skills).  Here are two of the many eye-popping statistics from Professor Babcock's work: 

  • Avoiding negotiating your first salary can cost you $500,000 by age 60 (oh, and men negotiate their first salaries 4x more often than women).

  • Women who consistently negotiate their salaries throughout their careers typically earn $1 million more in lifetime career earnings than women who don't.

So what motivates negotiators? Locus of control. Professor Babcock observes that people who negotiate tend to have a worldview that is more "optimistic than fatalistic, malleable versus fixed." Psychologists have noted that men consistently - across countries - have a higher propensity to see "the world as their oyster" than women.  Ergo, more men negotiate than women.

Alas, her research also shows that, "Men can behave anyway they want when they negotiate, but people have a strong preference for how women negotiate. Direct and aggressive doesn't work." For women a "more cooperative and relationship oriented" approach tends to be more effective.  When women adopt a bold can-do attitude they are often met with a "visceral reaction to strong women" and perceived as being not nice. Clearly, for women to achieve lasting pay parity, this has to change... but that's a whole 'nother topic.

Let's get back to how this discussion can improve your life now

This gut-wrenching economic environment may not seem the obvious one in which to rock the boat. But it's also an environment when employers can't afford to lose their best people. An innovative new website called GetRaised.com can help you make the most of your current situation.  With a few mouse clicks it will tell you if you are underpaid and for an additional $20 it will prepare a custom raise request that you can use to negotiate.  If you don't get a raise in 6 months you'll get your $20 back.  The company currently pegs the average raise received by users at $3,078. Not a bad return on $20.

What about you?  Have you ever asked for a raise and if so, how did it go?


[Want more financial love? You can follow Women's Financial Literacy Initiative founder, Manisha Thakor, on Twitter at @ManishaThakor or on Facebook at /ManishaThakor.

Comment /Source

Manisha Thakor

From Manisha's linkedin profile page:

Manisha Thakor is the Director of Wealth Strategies for Women at Buckingham Strategic Wealth and The BAM Alliance. 

Manisha and her colleagues provide both evidence-based wealth advisory services for high-net-worth households and core asset management solutions for women and families nationwide with $80,000 or more in investible assets. 

An ardent financial literacy advocate for women, Manisha is the co-author of two critically acclaimed personal finance books: ON MY OWN TWO FEET: a modern girl’s guide to personal finance and GET FINANCIALLY NAKED: how to talk money with your honey. She is on Faculty at The Omega Institute and serves as a Financial Fellow at Wellesley College. Manisha is also a member of The Wall Street Journal’s Wealth Experts Panel, a member of the 2015 CNBC Financial Advisor’s Council, and wearing her financial educator’s hat serves as a part of TIAA-CREF’s Women’s Initiative. 

Manisha's financial advice has been featured in a wide range of national media outlets including CNN, PBS, NPR, The Today Show, Rachel Ray, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The LA Times, Real Simple, Women’s Day, Glamour, Essence, and MORE magazine.

Prior to joining the Buckingham team, Manisha spent over twenty years working in financial services. On the institutional side she worked as an analyst, portfolio manager and client relations executive at SG Warburg, Atalanta/Sosnoff Capital, Fayez Sarofim & Co., and Sands Capital Management. After this she moved to the retail side and ran her own independent registered investment advisory firm, MoneyZen Wealth Management. 

Manisha earned her MBA from Harvard Business School in 1997, her BA from Wellesley College in 1992 and is a CFA charterholder. She lives in Portland, OR where she delights in the amazing Third Wave coffee scene and stunning natural beauty of the Pacific NorthWest. Manisha’s website is MoneyZen.com.

Daring To Be Ourselves... Financially

by Manisha Thakor

 Do you have enough money?

 Last week I wrote about the high cost to women of not speaking up for ourselves financially in the workplace.  One statistic from that piece keeps floating through my head like the Goodyear blimp:  Women who consistently negotiate their salaries throughout their careers earn $1 million more over their work lives than women who do not.

This struck me for two reasons.  First, during my 15 years in corporate America I never once asked for a raise.  Why?  When I'm 100% honest with myself it's that I was afraid to "Just Do It" as the Nike commercial says. I didn't want to sound pushy, greedy, or heaven forbid:  "Not. Nice."  Second, 57 women were kind enough to take a short survey I put together about their feelings around money.  By far the number one phrase that popped up was "not enough money."  Some of it was frustration about not having enough money right now due to job loss, health issues, lack of understanding about personal finance and/or poor spending habits.  Some of it was fear around not having enough money in retirement.  But over and over that same phrase, "not enough money," kept coming up.  So I asked myself to what degree our fear about not having enough money and ending up old and poor can be transformed by our own actions.

For inspiration, I decided to turn to Feminist.com founder Marianne Schnall's inspiring new book, Daring To Be Ourselves: influential women share insights on courage, happiness and finding your own voice.  Schnall's book is a delightful compendium of quotes from women ranging from Maya Angelou to Madeleine Albright to Margaret Cho.  While these insights extend to broader issues, I find that they can also be applied to money.  For example, if you are feeling like you don't have "enough money" and that the root cause might be that you are not speaking up in the workplace and/or daring to be yourself financially, here are a few of my favorite abbreviated snippets from Daring To Be Ourselves to use as money mantras:

... no matter how hard it is to do it, it’s harder not to do it.  Then you’re stuck with wondering, ‘What if I had said...?’ ‘What if I had done...?
— Gloria Steinem
Get over the feeling that the two words don’t go together - women and power... We have to own our personal power...
— Jane Fonda
Stop living your life as if you’re going to be rescued... and you will transform whatever pain is inside you.
— Eve Ensler

What about you - do you have any money mantras that help you speak up and own your financial power?


Want more financial love? You can follow Women's Financial Literacy Initiative founder, Manisha Thakor, on Twitter at @ManishaThakor or on Facebook at /ManishaThakor.

Comment /Source

Manisha Thakor

From Manisha's linkedin profile page:

Manisha Thakor is the Director of Wealth Strategies for Women at Buckingham Strategic Wealth and The BAM Alliance. 

Manisha and her colleagues provide both evidence-based wealth advisory services for high-net-worth households and core asset management solutions for women and families nationwide with $80,000 or more in investible assets. 

An ardent financial literacy advocate for women, Manisha is the co-author of two critically acclaimed personal finance books: ON MY OWN TWO FEET: a modern girl’s guide to personal finance and GET FINANCIALLY NAKED: how to talk money with your honey. She is on Faculty at The Omega Institute and serves as a Financial Fellow at Wellesley College. Manisha is also a member of The Wall Street Journal’s Wealth Experts Panel, a member of the 2015 CNBC Financial Advisor’s Council, and wearing her financial educator’s hat serves as a part of TIAA-CREF’s Women’s Initiative. 

Manisha's financial advice has been featured in a wide range of national media outlets including CNN, PBS, NPR, The Today Show, Rachel Ray, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The LA Times, Real Simple, Women’s Day, Glamour, Essence, and MORE magazine.

Prior to joining the Buckingham team, Manisha spent over twenty years working in financial services. On the institutional side she worked as an analyst, portfolio manager and client relations executive at SG Warburg, Atalanta/Sosnoff Capital, Fayez Sarofim & Co., and Sands Capital Management. After this she moved to the retail side and ran her own independent registered investment advisory firm, MoneyZen Wealth Management. 

Manisha earned her MBA from Harvard Business School in 1997, her BA from Wellesley College in 1992 and is a CFA charterholder. She lives in Portland, OR where she delights in the amazing Third Wave coffee scene and stunning natural beauty of the Pacific NorthWest. Manisha’s website is MoneyZen.com.

Are You Financial Savvy? What’s Good For Women is Good For Business!

by Janet Wise

Recently I met Sylvia Hewitt, co-founder of the Hidden Brain Drain, Harvard Professor and author of several books, including Top Talent.  As a Leadership Development expert, I’ve been researching Women and Leadership and was fascinated to learn:

  1. that women are identified as the power behind the new Global economy; and
  2. the various ways that smart companies and entrepreneurs are designing everything from marketing campaigns and product solutions with this demographic in mind

You can read some case studies here, but keep front and center, what’s good for women is good for business. How good? Well if US based women-owned businesses were their own country, they would have the 5th largest GDP in the world, trailing closely behind Germany and ahead of countries including France, UK and Italy – that’s close to $2.8 trillion – and once again proves that women owned firms are not a small, niche market but a major contributor and player in overall economy.  How are you preparing yourself financially to weigh in on this powerful spend?

Are you financial savvy

The research also shows that one woman every 60seconds leaves her corporate position to start her own company. Are you financially savvy to join the ranks of these entrepreneurial women?  Even if you’re content with your corporate role, this statistic suggests that corporations, wishing to retain their female talent, will need to offer more than a positive work culture and ensure they offer competitive salaries, if they want to attract and retain their top talent.   Large corporations need to offer competitive and comprehensive compensation packages – are you taking full advantage of compensation and investment opportunities?  Joining and participating in Savvy Ladies programs and events are a sure link to tap into the power of the female economy.

Comment

Janet Wise

Janet has a Masters Degree in HR Development, and is a successful corporate Learning & Development expert responsible for designing, leading and managing global leadership development programs at Fortune 500 companies, with more than fifteen years experience helping top corporate executives become more effective in their business and personal lives.

Job Loss as Personal Growth

by Kristina Leonardi

If you are one of those people who has lost your job, or feel like a pink slip is on the horizon, I want you to know that I believe this can be one of the best things that will ever happen to you.

Job loss can give you the opportunity to make a career move you've needed all along but were too afraid, lazy or apathetic to do anything about. If you've been stuck in a rut, been unhappy with your career, or needed to re-shift your work/life balance, this is the time you can do it. Losing your job forces you to examine every area of your life and gives you no choice but to take action, make changes and grow. It asks you to re-evaluate your sense of self -– is your identity and self worth solely based on your job, career or salary? Those can be some tough questions, but we should all examine ourselves like that at least once in our lives and are always better off by doing so.

The loss of a job gives you the chance to assess and re-prioritize what in life is meaningful to you, and what you have or have not been doing up until now to achieve those things. One’s career choice is at the top of that list, and it is a serious reality check on all levels. But in reality, this is a good thing, because then you can start making decisions that get you closer to where you really want to be.

Right now, a lot of people are doing some serious soul-searching: they are looking to value things more important than money; they are finding internal strength and personal resources they might not have discovered otherwise. An increase in community, innovation and altruism will occur as a result of all that’s happening, and as difficult as this time is, at the end of this cycle I do think we will end up being more fulfilled and grounded than ever. Although our net worth may be less, our quality of life can improve dramatically and become enriched in other ways.

It certainly is a tough time if you haven’t prepared in any way, but it can also be a good one for those who can accept change with the right attitude and can take those proverbial lemons and make some tasty lemonade!

Have you lost your job recently or in the past? How have you grown as a result? What are some changes that have occurred?